Often asked: Who Is The Patron Saint Of Schools?

Who is the patron saint for education?

John Baptist de la Salle – Patron of Teachers In many ways you can attribute our modern classroom setting to St. John Baptist de la Salle. He was the founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, and also established teacher colleges throughout France.

Who is the female saint of education?

St. Angela Merici, (born March 21, 1474, Desenzano, Republic of Venice [Italy]—died January 27, 1540, Brescia; canonized May 24, 1807; feast day January 27), founder of the Ursuline order, the oldest religious order of women in the Roman Catholic Church dedicated to the education of girls.

Who is the patron of all Catholic schools?

Elizabeth Ann Seton, Patron Saint of Catholic Schools.

Who is the patron saint of serious illness?

St Camillus, as the patron saint of the sick, hospitals, nurses and physicians, is another all rounder. He is also reputedly a good bet for those seeking help with gambling. St Pantaleon, meanwhile, is often depicted as a physician holding a phial of medicine.

Who is the patron saint of love?

Dwynwen is the patron saint of lovers. Her feast day is January 25, Dydd Santes Dwynwen.

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Who is the patron saint of strength and courage?

Saint Sebastian He is commonly depicted in art and literature tied to a post or tree and shot with arrows. The artistic depiction of St Sebastian is considered symbolic of the virtues and gifts of strength, stamina, perseverance, courage and justice in the face of adversity.

Who is the saint of exams?

St. Joseph of Cupertino was plagued by these obstacles his entire life, and is now the patron saint of exams. Because of his gift of levitation, he is also the patron saint of pilots, paratroopers and air travelers.

Who is the saint of math?

Hubertus or Hubert ( c. 656 – 30 May 727 A.D.) was a Christian saint who became the first bishop of Liège in 708 A.D. He is the patron saint of hunters, mathematicians, opticians, and metalworkers.